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Favourite Massage Tools?

Discussion in 'Massage Therapies & Techniques' started by foebpasse, Feb 29, 2012.


MoonLight Spa
  1. foebpasse

    foebpasse New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    Location:
    RU
    I'm considering purchasing an omni massage roller tool and/or omni knuckle roller tool - not just to use on clients but also so my partner can massage my aching muscles.

    I'd love some recommendations on tools you've used successfully on clients and/or yourself?

    Namaste
     
  2. Eric OConnell

    Eric OConnell New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    sorry yogajoga, my fav massage tools are my hands, thumbs and forearms.
     
  3. Amanda Xrawrx

    Amanda Xrawrx New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Yes me too daisychain, plus fists and knuckles... Sorry yogajoga! I know that some massage therapists use tools, but not sure what ones.
     
  4. Rickey <3s Reily

    Rickey <3s Reily New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2010
    Hi ya

    Like Daisy Chain I use my hands, thumbs, forearms and also levering in with the elbow. But my real favourite is walking on the client with my feet!

    Cheers

    Reiki Pixie
     
  5. Sgt. Kendra

    Sgt. Kendra Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    All of the above (except perhaps the walking on). The power of the massage is in the touch. You don't have to use heavy pressure to smooth out knotted muscles. You need to be able to 'feel' the body to facilitate healing. IMHO
     
  6. beholdtheglory

    beholdtheglory Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    I like to keep an open mind and try to see all therapies and tools have a place (including colonic hydrotherapy, ear candling, or even those aqua detox things) wisely chosen within a therapeutic context. But the human touch is something else altogether and can't be beaten. The subtleness of touch is something tools and machines won't be replacing.

    Reiki Pixie
     
  7. Pompal 09.

    Pompal 09. Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    couldn't agree more - however, using a tool intuitively, gently and safely can help therapists who have over-use injuries and shouldn't be overlooked. also, when i get home of an evening I'd like my partner, who isn't a therapist, to massage my achey bits and using a tool - like a wooden roller up and down either side of my spine - would feel great and not rely on him learning any intution or technique.
     
  8. Katie G

    Katie G New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    Any tools that help with trigger points and knots deep deep down in the belly of the traps of huge rugby players!
     
  9. publicdisgrace

    publicdisgrace New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2011
    Location:
    US
    Artificial thumbs and the thumper were pretty much the only tools I ever used for massage
     
  10. Pompal 09.

    Pompal 09. Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2011
    Hi ya

    Actually I do use one tool, and that is Thai foot massage stick. Really good at stimulating reflex and acu points on the feet. It doesn't have to hurt and it prevents RSI that often reflexologists have in the thumbs.

    Cheers

    Reiki Pixie
     
  11. bxeiuuryicdiwzefj

    bxeiuuryicdiwzefj New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Location:
    United States
    thanks! on the weekend i bought a wooden device from body shop. it's two wooden balls at the end of a wand - felt great when tested in the shop. partner has yet to try it out on me.

    http://www.thebodyshop.co.uk/invt/18792
     
  12. Elosi Paschal

    Elosi Paschal New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Hi Yogajoga

    How did you find your massage roller? Have you seen the 'back knobbler' on the FHT on-line catalogue site (Who needs a husband when you can have a knobbler!) http://www.fhtonline.co.uk/product.asp?productid=1221&sectionid=28.
    For my own back I like the idea of massage tools and looked at the Omniroller at Holistic Health last weekend. But I would end up doing an impression of a wart-hog scratching up against a tree with that one as I wouldn't have the reach.
    On the point of being a purist and only using your hands etc, Hot Stones and similar aids, would these not be classed as massage tools?
     
  13. sacha m

    sacha m Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2009
    For any massage hands, fingers, arms, legs, feet and occasional the head are always my tools of choice. However there are times when you need to apply very deep specific pressure, doing so repeatedly can lead to injury of the therapist - never good. Using a tool to help can certainly help, i've looked at many different massage tools are there are only two I use in treatments and retail to my clients. One is the Omni Roller, I don't use it that often but it comes in useful occasionally and I have a few clients that have found it very helpful for use between treatments. The Knuckleballer is great on big muscular legs, but I *love* it for giving myself a foot massage - the little balls rolling over the soles of my feet feels delish.

    And of course you can heat or cool the Omni Roller as you need - the stainless steel one is *very* heavy! And it looks nice on my display as a conversation point.

    I have worked closely with Ellis of Omni Massage UK on a few projects, if you have any questions or would like to retail them yourself to clients I would definitely suggest giving him a call.

    The other massage tool is the Angel Fingers, again very occasionally this can feel lovely for a slightly different feel to feathering. But I love that kind of touch myself - sends a shiver down my spine.

    Mat
     
  14. MassagingGenie

    MassagingGenie Newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2014
    Location:
    Canada Baby
    In my opinion, I think a foot roller is best. This is because they are very cost friendly and if you know how to use them, they work like a charm!
     

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